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international issues of the day such as our topic for tonight, u.s./pakistan relations. on behalf of the wefpg and our board members who are present tonight, dawn, gayle, donna and teresa, i want to welcome everybody here. we're so glad that you could join us for this behind-the-headlines event. these are events on hot issues in the news, and recently we've done events on egypt, libya, women in the middle east, um, and our event tonight is with ambassador husain haqqani, the pakistani ambassador to the who will be joined by our friend and frequent speaker and moderator, washington post's senior national security correspondent karen deyoung. for a conversation on u.s./pakistan relations. the event could not be more timely, as we all know, given the increased tensions in the relationship between the two countries following the killing of osama bin laden. we're so pleased to have the ambassador with us tonight to explore the complexities and the importance of this relationship and extremely lucky to have karen back. i want to recognize a few guests who are here with us tonight, undersecretary of
post" senior, senior correspondent karen de young for a conversation on u.s.-pakistan relations. the event could not be more timely as we all know, given the increased tensions in the relationship between the two countries following the killing of osama bin laden. we are so pleased to have the ambassador with us tonight to explore the complexities and the importance of this relationship and extremely lucky to have karen back. i want to recognize if you guess who are here with us tonight. undersecretary of state for public diplomacy, judith mchale. [applause] principle deputy assistant secretary for economic energy and business affairs, deborah mccarthy. [applause] members of our corporate advisory council and of course our many ambassadors and diplomatic colleagues who work very closely throughout the years on our embassy events. our next one is going to be in july at the embassy exam the end it will be on african women leaders promoting investment, trade and peace. we are hoping that many of you will be able to join us for this very special event. and now it gives me great plea
-span.org. >> john brennan unveiled unused counterterrorism strategy and pakistan -- on velde a and new counter-terrorism strategy on pakistan -- unveiled a new counterterrorism strategy for pakistan. this is about one hour, 50 minutes. >> have never heard it so quiet. that is a sense of our anticipation and excitement about our program today. we welcome you. many on and guests, dear student, faculty, others, we are pleased and honored to host john brennan, the assistant to the president for homeland security and terrorism -- counter- terrorism. it introduced are speaker, we have the perfect person right here in our community. prof. john mclaughlin is a member of our faculty, holding the position of distinguish practitioner at the philip merrill center for strategic studies. as many of you know, john had a highly distinguished career as a central event -- at the central intelligence agency. beginning in 1972 car racing to the rank of deputy director, acting director in two dozen for. no one could have a keener appreciation of the challenges facing our speaker every day. professor, prepared -- t
and pakistan leads our overall policy efforts and we are supporting his efforts, ambassador grossman's efforts, to develop all of the different elements of our policies. >> tried to get him here but couldn't. >> okay. so, in other words, you aren't in a position really to answer my question? is that what you're saying? >> yes, senator. i would defer to the special representatives office. >> then would you since the question is to you would you get me a written answer to the question? >> i will, sir. >> thank you. mr. harrigan, what are dea's plans for continued operations should military forces draw down to levels that would not allow adequate support for your operations? >> well, again, co-chairman grassley, i have been in discussions really for the last 18 months with my counter part at the podium here, mr. wechsler, as well as our regional director in afghanistan with the u.s. military and si isaf forces. dea has no intention of drawing down any of our 81 personnel. it would be a bit premature to see right now how the drawdown will impact dea but let me assure you we continue to work with t
? >> the special representative for afghanistan and pakistan leads our overall policy efforts ande are supporting his efforts, ambassador grossman's efforts, to develop all of the different elements of our policies. >> tried to get him here but couldn't. >> okay. so, in other words, you aren't in a position really to answer my question? is that what you're saying? >> yes, senator. i would defer to the special representatives office. >> then would you since the question is to you would you get me a written answer to the question? >> i will, sir. >> thank you. mr. harrigan, what are dea's plans for continued operations should military forces draw down to levels that would not allow adequate support for your operations? >> well, again, co-chairman grassley, i have been in discussions really for the last 18 months with my counter part at the podium here, mr. wechsler, as well as our regional director in afghanistan with the u.s. military and si isaf forces. dea has no intention of drawing down any of our 81 personnel. it would be a bit premature to see right now how the drawdown will impact dea but l
war, which is iraq, afghanistan, to some extent pakistan, possibly iran. this is the battle the united states is facing. the balance of power in the region, the iran iraqi, the indo-pakistani. each one of them have destabilized over 10 years. in the air of israel relationship, barring some dramatic change in egypt over time, israel is so dominant that it creates new realities on the ground. there's a difference to what the united states really says very often. in afghanistan the united states is asking pakistan to do things that create stability, that will weaken pakistan, that potentially cratered an independent regional power in india, that the united states may not appreciate in the long run. and, of course, the invasion of iraq has destroyed the iraq power, they're forgetting nuclear weapons. iran is the dominant conventional military force in the region. if the united states is there. the united states as its policies to withdraw from iraq, the potential for iran to fill the vacuum is extremely high. that in turn changes the balance of power, orderlies the political dynamic in the
colorado continuing this conversation. up next conversation with pakistan's ambassador to the u.s.. the ambassador talks about the long term strategic relationship between the u.s. and pakistan and the raid on osama bin laden's compound in pakistan. this is moderated by senior national security correspondent for "the washington post" care and de young who stood by the group patricia ellis gives a brief opening remarks. this is an hour and 20 minutes. >> good evening everyone and welcome. i am going to start again. sorry. good evening, everyone, and welcome. i'm patricia less president of the women's foreign policy group. we promote women's leadership and of places pressing international issues of the day such as our topic for tonight, u.s.-pakistan relations. on behalf of the wfpg and board members present tonight, don, gayle, theresa, donna, i want to welcome everybody here. we are so glad that you could join us for this the high end of the headline yvette. these are evens on hot issues in the news and recently we have done a fence on egypt, libya, women in the middle east, and
petraeus, has been holding security talks in pakistan as divisions deepen between washington and islamabad. the u.s. is holding hundreds of millions of dollars in security assistance. pakistan has called for an end to u.s. drone raids that have been taking an increasing civilian toll. >> u.s. drones' fly it around the clock in pakistan, targeting fighters in the mountainous region bordering afghanistan. civilians are often killed in the attacks. pakistan has condemned the ground strikes as a violation of its sovereignty, although some analysts believe they are carried out with the help of pakistan the -- pakistani intelligence. >> we are firmly against all terrorist groups. but we fight in partnership with other law-enforcement agencies. >> washington announced it was holding back a third of the military aid earmarked for pakistan, $100 million. airstrikes are putting more pressure on the already tense relationship between the u.s. and pakistan. >> give the pakistan government the drones. that is the way it should be. [unintelligible] >> the dispute shows no sign of easing. islamabad is th
based in pakistan. these latest bombs have been described as relatively crude and possibly the work of local militants. whoever is behind them makes sure that india's city is still vulnerable. >> for more on today's violence, i spoke with the ambassador who formerly served as u.s. assistant secretary of state for south asian affairs. he is currently at the center for strategic and international studies. i started by asking who he thought could be behind the attacks. >> well, i know one thing, that mumbai, it is a very sad day for mumbai, the fourth attack in the last 10 years. this city has been attacked by terrorists on many occasions, and this is the latest episode. it does not appear to be the same nature of attack that occurred in november of 2008, the suicide bombers that attacked in mumbai, killing 166 people that were tied to the l.e.t., a pakistani-based militant group. this appears to be more sporadic. it does not appear to be the same kind of attack. india has seen these before by a group called north dakota and mehanna hedin. it is an indigenous group. they have done thes
right, i'm talking about my pac on the air. then, can we trust pakistan to find out i'll close my eyes and fall into their arms. (laughter) >> stephen: and my guest timothy garton ash believes reporting the facts can change the course of history. then again, so can wikipedia. a french couple has adopted a 265 pound gor la. and in tomorrow's news, a french couple is malled by newly orphanned gor la. this is "the colbert report." captioning sponsored by comedy central ( theme song playing ) ( cheers and applause ) >> stephen: welcome to the report, everybody! thank you for joining us. thank you, everybody. stephen, stephen, stephen! stephen, stephen, stephen! >> stephen: beautiful, thank you so much, everybody. you're too kind. (cheers and applause) >> stephen: folks, thank you, thank you here, up there, i want to say i had to any half -- thieves who are joining us tonight. hope all your attacks are plus two. nation, tonight you are witnessing history so i hope you all remember where are you right now. for me, i'm right here. (laughter) write that down so i don't forget. because i just f
that was taking her from brooklyn, new york to karachi, pakistan and then she would move to the horror -- lahore, this is the first of the letters i found at the new york public library, which was my introduction to margaret marcus. may 1962, the hellenic torch. this is posted from alexandria egypt. after all of our goodbyes, after you mother betty and walter walked down the plank and drove off, i was overcome by profound sense of dread. i stood to attack rail for a long time completely stricken. the excitement of the weeks leading up to my departure gone. when the ship pulled away from the brooklyn pier condo late to the city city began to dance in the engine seemed to echo the pounding of my heart, a black and fathomless ocean slowly swallowing everything i own. it takes some time and many prayers before my fear began to subside. so she goes on to tell her parents about the various odd years on board. there is a captain and his great crew who are very suspicious of this journey that she was making to pakistan. mother come you imagine i was going to need men i still dressed for dining and danci
. the fact is we went into a country to fight al qaeda who was all in the mountains in pakistan and even in the cities in pakistan, probably with the knowledge of the pakistani government. and we've wasted a lot of money and lives in an area where we didn't need to be, because that war will continue. there are only 100 al qaeda give or take left in afghanistan. but there are al qaeda in other spots in the middle east. and al qaeda's people have plotted terrorist activities from germany and from other places in europe. they don't need osama bin laden's base to have activity. there's nothing you need -- as far as the soviet union, the soviet union went down for goodly reasons, because of all the money they spent in afghanistan. true, we were there fighting them, but their attempt at gaining empire, which has been the loss of many empires, stretching too far and going beyond their supply lines, killed them. they spent money there and they'd like us to stay there. they're being real nice to us. they're helping us with bases, to bring in armaments and troops and supplies. come on, america. sp
and london. still to come, it is a year since the floods that does -- devastated pakistan, but what is life like for the hundreds of thousands still homeless? >> and we find out what life is like for america's poor more than 70 years after the -- "the grapes of wrath" was published. senior officers in norway could not confirm that all of those missing had been found. prosecutors say anders breivik will be interrogated again on friday. >> outside the cathedral, the floral carpet continues to grow. one of these attributes could easily have been for him, he knows. he came face-to-face with the gun man and lived. >> he started shooting around me and he got several of the guys around me. and he had to reload his gun. i got my chance to get away and run into the water. and i started swimming. i got my clothing off and kicked my boots off and started swimming. >> was he still firing at you? >> he reloaded and was firing again. he went down to the water and shot many of them trying to escape. but luckily, he did not get me. i was just lucky. >> in fact, the majority of the people on the island did
pakistan describes the move against an american citizen arrested in the u.s. this week and accused of working for pakistan. this is the latest in a rapidly deteriorating relationship which was highlighted when the u.s. killed osama bin laden and pakistan. the prime minister is currently in london. my colleague asked if he understood why the u.s. had not told pakistan. >> that is the thing we did not like. >> you understand why? >> they did not want to share their victory with pakistan, they only want to share defeat. >> what they're indicating is that they did not trust the military and your security services to not leak it. >> when we had intelligence sharing with them and the people, the most wanted terrorist of al qaeda, we helped them. there was no reason not to share with us. >> did the isi note that osama bin laden was less than a mile away from your defense academy? >> he had been there for a long time. i want to ask you one question, whether the world intelligence failed? the whole failure of the world. >> did you know that bin laden was there? did your intelligence service
's most violent cities. >> the pakistan's new foreign minister has arrived in the indian capital, del lee, for talks with her counterpart. it's the first talks since relations were frozen after the mumbai attacks in 2008. as our reporter reports, chances of a major breakthrough appear slim. >> these are the first talks of this for a year and substantial talks after the 2008 mumbai attacks in which more than 160 people were killed and which, of course, were blamed on pakistan-based militant groups. pakistan will be represented at these talks by newly appointed foreign minister, all of 34, and the first woman to hold this post. there were preliminary discussions setting the stage for the main round. they made all the right noises, saying they're entering the talks in a positive state of mind. but talks between india and pakistan can be tricky. for india, the main issue is terror. they want more action against pakistan-based militant groups, especially those responsible for the 2008 attacks. and though very quick to respond after the capture and killing of osama bin laden on pakistani soil,
arrived in baghdad for his trip in pakistan. nice to see you. >> i'm away. you're away. >> we're here. >> anyway. let's talk about leon panetta. >> yeah. >> the old unannounced visit. it will be a mark -- one of the things that really pointing out is accusations of iran arming iraqi insurgents using the weapons, obviously, against u.s. troops. i've been there 11 times. they used to say this years ago, that the iranians were providing technology as the charges that were doing so much damage to u.s. armored vehicles. now they're talking about it being rockets and things like that, upping the ante in terms of the weaponry. and leon panetta saying the u.s. won't stand for that. they'll protect the troops. last month was a bad month for u.s. troops. more than a dozen troops were kills in iraq. worst month in two years, exactly two years. >> is there a message here from iran as we start to pull -- as u.s. starts to pull troops out of iraq? they're supposed to be out by the end of this year? >> yeah, well, you know, iran had a lot of influence in iraq really for years now. it's one of the by
towards that group. >> interesting because in 2008, india blames elements within pakistan. do you think that there might be a coincidence in these attacks happening just months after the peace talks between india and pakistan started? >> it is inconceivable that india would have any role in this because india and pakistan are now engaged in a dialogue. the foreign ministers will be meeting shortly. pakistan is facing multiple threats. we have had an outbreak of sectarian violence. we know how involved they are. we have a pakistani taliban attack. we are at the point of a new low. the idea that pakistan would instigate a crisis with india at this point is inconceivable. >> what about indian intelligence gathering and security? there has been a number of cracks, particularly since 2008. is this any reflection on the indian authority's confidence? >> there will be questions about another attack in mumbai. after 2008, there were major reviews within india within -- about internal security. in this case, there would be a very close examination of how close that india has responded. they have
has in the wars in afghanistan and iraq, managing the thorny pakistan relationship and preparing the united states for a leaner future. we started with afghanistan. with bin laden dead and relations with pakistan fraying. americans, including those who served in afghani, are saying that the mission is unduable the best course is to withdrawal as soon as possible. i asked the chief if the mission is still achievable. >> a critical part of the world. as we focus on this, it has been a focus on both afghanistan and pakistan and the region. as you said, bin laden is dead and had a huge impact on al- qaeda, but it did not eliminate al-qaeda. their leadership still lives there, and they threaten to plot and kill as many americans as they possibly can. we need to continue the press on al-qaeda and defeat them. strategically defeat them. that can only be done there. secondly, we are, with respect to afghanistan, we are working our way through a long-term strategic agreement right now, which, to which afghanistan president hamid karzai has indicated strong support. all of that is tied to
scandal. and a year after floods devastated pakistan, we talk to the man in charge of the u.n. relief operation. it is 9:00 a.m. and singapore. >> it is 2:00 a.m. in london, broadcasting on pbs in america and around the world, this is "newsday." >>> hello and welcome. rebel leaders in that libya say their military leader, general younes, has been shot dead. the head of the council said he was killed by an armed gang after he was recalled from the front to appear before a judicial committee. >> for many years, younes was firmly at colonel gaddafi's side. when the conflict broke out in february, he was one of the first high-profile figures to defect. though he became the man who led the note rebels' military against colonel gaddafi, it seems he was never fully trusted by the insurgents. some suggest that his presence spearheading their efforts to topple the government deeply uncomfortable. nor was he ever given by the gaddafi inner circle. either way, his death has come under strange circumstances. the chairman of the national transitional council said that general younes was shot short
. >>> then pulling the plug on pakistan. we're holding back hundreds of millions of dollars in aid. will that make them a better ally or push them into the arms of our enemy? >>> joining me now from capitol hill to discuss the top story we've been talking about, is cnn congressional correspondent kate bolduan. have they had any breakthrough in the negotiations? they just talk, talk, talk. >> i often feel like i'm repeating myself. we have to tell you, there's no breakthroughs to report this evening. the meeting at the white house lasted about an hour and 45 minutes. i'm told from congressional sources that the focus was largely on the framework that had kind of been identified and come to pass in the biden talks. these are talks that were bipartisan talks that lasted for weeks and fell apart. republicans saying that there was an impasse having to do with taxes, in that package of savings, if you will, that was identified. it was largely had to do with spending cuts. republicans, by their math, said they had come to about $2 trillion plus in savings, but the president disputed their math saying acc
just one week away. >> pakistan and india ready for their first significant talks since the mumbai attacks. good night by angell. an emotional farewell at the singer's funeral in london. it is 11:00 a.m. in singapore. >> it is 4:00 a.m. in london. this is "newsday." >> hello, welcome. the norwegian lawyer asked to defend the killers says that he is probably insane. apparently he believes he was fashioning a war to defend the western world. some of the names of the 76 victims have been published. the latest on the investigation into friday's attacks. >> the official naming of the dead is under way. a shocking reminder that most children were victim -- most victims were children or young adults. among them was a 20-year-old model and talented dancer. the youngest is expected to be just 14. described by the norwegian prime minister as one of the country's most promising young politicians. another talented speaker attempted to escape. 45-year-old monica had run the summer camp for years. this is their self confessed killer. the lawyer defending him describe him as insane. >> the entire
that the gradually improving relations between pakistan and india are not given a dent from this attack? >> i think the indian government is being very cautious. i think they are not speculating and i think so it would be very early for me to speculate on why they decided to be very open-minded about this investigation. of course the 2008 attacks on mumbai, the indian government did accuse pakistan of having some involvement in this those attacks. the 2006 train bombings in the city happened in the rush hour, more than a dozen indian nationals arrested for that. it is very easy to -- there has been a lot of speculation and jumping to conclusions about the possibility of pakistan's involvement but the indian government is keeping an open mind. pakistan governments condemned the attacks shortly after they happened yesterday. indian opposition parties are pointing a finger in that direction but i think it is very early to draw any speculation about who might be behind this attack, particularly because they say they are still working on very limited intelligence. >> thank you very much indeed. the chin
that pakistan spy agency was behind the recent murder of a journalist critical of the military there. we'll have the details on that. >>> plus, a lesson in the perils of trying to help a loved one escape a prison in your overnight bag. details on this covert operation a bit later. >>> first let's get to the news. live at 5:30 a.m. at 30 rock in new york city. >>> with an august 2nd deadline, the house and senate are cutting their congressional recess short this week. as democrats and republicans try to strike a deal, "the new york times" reports that the barack obama administration is proposed cuts of tens of billions of dollars to medicare and medicaid as part of those ongoing talks. the times says the money would come from health care providers without directly imposing new costs from patients and radically changing the programs, however the health of the cuts depend on whether the republicans are willing to accept any increase in tax revenue. and regarding the revenue discussion, "wall street journal's" front page reets "deficit talks focus on taxes." the journal says that republicans are at
and military strategy in afghanistan and pakistan. if confirmed, general dempsey, who currently serves as army chief of staff, will succeed admiral mike mahlon who will retire a the end of september. a democrat carl levin chairs the senate armed services committee. >> good morning everybody. the committee meets this morning to consider the nomination ofmo general martin dempsey to bethii chairman of the joint chiefs of staff. it was not long ago that general dempsey came before us for his nomination hearing to become ago chief of staff of the army. we welcome him back. thanks again for his 36 years o dedicated service to the nation and his willingness to serve asm the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff. as we know from those decades of service, general dempsey is an exceptionally well qualified american soldier and leader.al we we were reminded of the last hearing, hell is also a proud we we husband, father and grandfathero huand,l dempsey, will you remain grateful for the sacrifices that you and your family have made over the years, for the devotion of your beloved wife and the military se
, pakistan telling america, keep your money, after the u.s. announced it's withholding $800 million in military aid. this is more evidence of the growing rift between the u.s. and pakistan. white house chief of staff william daly says it's in response to pakistan's decision to cut back on counterterrorism operations after the killing of osama bin laden. the u.s. typically gives pakistan more than $2 billion a year in security assistance. >>> u.s. joint chiefs of staff admiral -- chairman admiral mike mullen says china should no longer be described as a rising power, declaring it's a full-fledged world power hp he made the remarks at the start of a four-day visit to beijing. he called on china to become a global partner in addressing security challenges in asia and beyond. >>> jay si dugard speaking about her 18 years in captivity at the hands of philly and nancy garrido. she was 11 when kidnapped by garrido, a convicted sex offender, as she was walking to school. she talked about the long, horrifying ordeal with abc's diane sawyer. >> you would never know what she survived unless yo
pakistan's failure to act against militant extremists like the network in the north, the afghan taliban and other militant extremists. we will be interested in hearing general dempsey's thoughts on how to get the pakistan military to go after terrorist groups finding sanctuary in pakistan's tribal regions. al qaeda and the arabian peninsula in yemen and al qaeda elements in somalia continue to take advantage of failing and failed states to train their operatives and to plan attacks against the united states and our interests. it is critical that we don't apply significant pressure to these terrorist organizations, and to work with governments and international organizations in the region to address the long term problems. iran remains probably the greatest risk to world peace and to regional stability. we share the concerns of many nations about iran's continued support of terrorist activities beyond its borders, development of its missile programs, and refusal to cooperate with the international atomic energy commission. while we've seen evidence that the international sanctions has pu
and associated groups outside of afghanistan, pakistan and iraq. director leon panetta expressed concerns on the shifting to other places most notably in yemen, somalia, north africa, and i hope he will address what you see as the appropriate role for the special operation forces in those areas. in announcing lieutenant general allan's nomination, president obama called him, quote, the flight commander to take over the vital mission in afghanistan. if confirmed, the general will have big boots to fill and succeeding general petraeus commander of the 49 member international security assistance force coalition and u.s. forces afghanistan. like general petraeus, general allen brings an in-depth understanding of the complexities of the counterinsurgency effort based on his own experience as the commander in anbar province in iraq. working with the sunni awakening the marines and anbar succeeded in getting local sunni tribal leaders to reject the insurgency and instead support the iraqi government and its the deputy commander at u.s. central command general ellen has developed a regional persp
against al qaeda and associated groups outside of afghanistan, pakistan and iraq. director leon panetta expressed concerns on the shifting to other places most notably in yemen, somalia, north africa, and i hope he will address what you see as the appropriate role for the special operation forces in those aeas. in announcing lieutenant general allan's nomination, president obama called him, quote, the flight commander to take over the vital mission in afghanistan. if confirmed, the general will have big boots to fill and succeeding general petraeus commander of the 49 member international security assistance force coalition and u.s. forces aghanistan. like general petraeus, general allen brings an in-depth understanding of the complexities of the counterinsurgency effort based on his own experience as the coander in anbar province in iraq. working with the sunni awakening the marines andanbar succeeded in getting local sunni tribal leaders to reject the insurgency and instead support the iraqi government and its the deputy commander at u.s. central command general ellen has developed a
you, pat. the u.s. embassy under attack in syria. how is the united states responding? in pakistan they are burning our flags. and we are giving them millions. [ male announcer ] there's more barbeque time in every bag of kingsford charcoal. kingsford. slow down and grill. . >> our flag on fire, the u.s. embassy under attack as was the american ambassador's residence, people described as "thugs," reaching the wall of the embassy compound and breaking cameras and bonds and the united states is seeking compensation for the damage. meanwhile the united states announcing cutting back aid to pakistan. $800 million in military aid is being withheld after they decided to cancel vistas for 100 military trainers and my guest says the cuts are a good start. lieutenant colonel peters joins me. welcome. this is 40 percent of our annual aid to pakistan. should we retract the rest of it, as well? >>guest: i wish we could cut all aid to pakistan. pakistan is a rogue state. the pakistani military and security services are addicted to terror and we keep giving them money for another fix. but we can
. i guess, if it is not homegrown, it would be from the usual area that is pakistan. >> is that believed, that the authorities will be taking? if so, what will that do for relations between india and pakistan? >> there will be tension, but the indian government, like the rest of the world, is aware that tourism has increased quite sharply in the last few years in pakistan. they are, in fact, more of a victim of terrorism than we are. i think it will try to talk it out and tried to put in place methods by which -- and try to put in place methods by which they stop this terror. >> you say changing their methods. didn't we hear that in november of 2008? the authorities bolstered intelligence gathering and security after those attacks and this happened. doesn't this expose the weaknesses and vulnerabilities? >> it does not seem the nature of terrorism has changed. instead of sophisticated explosives, there improvised explosives, i.e.d.'s. these are used in various parts of india and used abroad. in afghanistan, for example. >> professor, thank you very much for talking t
is pakistan rebuilding after devastation? >> one country in the heart of europe appears to be immune to the currency crisis. switzerland's frank is rising high and it has become a haven for investors. how helpful is that in this economy? >> the landscape has attracted tourists for over a century. this year, visitors are counting their pennies. euro slides and the swiss franc rises. foreign tourists find switzerland too expensive. >> [speaking foreign language] >> i am watching the situation with enormous concern. things have gotten or sign the last few months. jobs and businesses are really in danger now and that's really bad for our local economy. >> the swiss franc is at an all- time high against the euro. a new study shows that 1000 hotels across the swiss south are threatened with closure. >> there have been job cuts. each of the hotels have already had to cut back on jobs. we have cut two positions. >> hotel owners are looking anxiously to the government for solutions. so far, in vain. an attempt by the swiss national bank to buy out euros and slow down the rise of the swiss fra
operations in pakistan? >> let me say a couple things about that. number one, from the outset of the administration we determined that we would launch an aggressive, focused, relentless effort on al qaeda and associated groups to dismantle, disrupt and ultimately defeat them. we've been doing that successfully. and we're going to continue these efforts and these efforts are focus the on al qaeda central and south asia but also focused on affiliates around the world, number one. number two, we have the capability to continue this. without commenting on the story that you have outlined here, i have every confidence we can continue this, that we will continue this effort at a pace in an intensity that will allow to us put al qaeda -- continue to put al qaeda on the road to defeat with respect to the pakistanis. the pakistanis, fareed, and the united states have a complicated relationship, as you know. there will be frustrations and disagreements. we remained engaged with the pakistanis for a number of very important reasons related to our national security and ultimately their se
the pakistan border. this is a critical area for the insurgents and the cross border infiltration and this is a historic avenue for movement from pakistan into afghanistan. in terms of the risk to u.s. troops, how will you characterize this? >> there is a significant amount of influx of insurgent fighters in the area, mostly from pakistan moving into afghanistan. >> tell us a little bit about your mission. >> this the standard reconnaissance mission, along the historic route from pakistan. the terrain is inaccessible, so we are going there to see what this looks like for a future clearing operation. the major challenges the terrain, which is extreme and very difficult to move. and also, the people there have not seen the coalition presence in some time. >> what do you hope to achieve to the mission. >> to accept these conditions for future operations and build our awareness of the atmosphere, so that we can continue the operations there. this is for the clear insurgent presence in the area. >> how do you tell if you have succeeded? >> the numbers that occur in the area, we have re
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